Unclaimed Baggage

Unclaimed Baggage

All of us carry a great deal of unclaimed baggage around with us every day—wounds inflicted on us from childhood or failed relationships, wounds we have inflicted on our children or spouses, sins and failures of which we are ashamed. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could dump all of that baggage at some airport terminal and leave it there? Continue reading Unclaimed Baggage

The Lost Son–Luke 15:11-32

The Lost Son–Luke 15:11-32

Our Scripture lesson this morning is usually called “the parable of the prodigal son,” but in my mind, a better title would be “the parable of the lost son.” It is one of three parables that Jesus tells in Luke chapter 15—the parable of the lost sheep, the parable of the lost coin and the parable of the lost son. Each parable has a similar plot. Something is lost, something is found, and then there is a party.

These parables show us the three things about the character of God: 1) God is a God of compassion; 2)
God is a God who loves to party; 3) God is a God of grace. Continue reading The Lost Son–Luke 15:11-32

Of Towers, Fig Trees and Repentance–A Sermon on Luke 13:1-9

Of Towers, Fig Trees and Repentance–A Sermon on Luke 13:1-9

Jesus says, No, the death of the innocents had nothing to do with their sin. However, what he says next is absolutely shocking. “They didn’t sin” Jesus says, “but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did.” And lest we missed it, he repeats it a second time, “unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.” To be honest Jesus sounds like a fire and brimstone preacher: “Repent or perish! Turn or burn!”

So what does Jesus mean by repentance Continue reading Of Towers, Fig Trees and Repentance–A Sermon on Luke 13:1-9

A Study in Contrasts: The Centurion and the Widow of Nain–Luke 7:1-17

A Study in Contrasts: The Centurion and the Widow of Nain–Luke 7:1-17

The first story, set in Capernaum, deals with people enjoying power and status both from the Roman realm and the Jewish hierarchy.

The scene in Nain is decidedly more rustic and lower class. There is a “large crowd,” but there are no dignitaries, no intermediaries, no prepared speeches.

Thankfully, Jesus doesn’t bother with such distinctions. Continue reading A Study in Contrasts: The Centurion and the Widow of Nain–Luke 7:1-17